About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
that everybody would have an example or know people who were trafficked. and that's what brought us ultimately to odessa. >> narrator: frustrated with an inability to chase the traffickers overseas, the ukrainian secret service has given us a tip about a suspected sex trader who regularly brings girls through here. across from the port, on the famous odessa steps, we secretly film as she traffics young women to turkey. we've been asked to call her olga. >> the secret service said that she runs a legitimate business as a cover, and she basically takes women from moldova and ukraine to work as domestics in turkey. and amongst these women are some younger women who she sells to traffickers and pimps in turkey. we wanted to answer some fundamental questions, like why don't these women run away, and how do they get across borders, and how do they get kidnapped, and how could they really be enslaved, in... you know, at this point in history? >> sex trafficking only started with the fall of the soviet union when the borders opened up and it became much easier for traffickers to find desperate girls,
in me. >> taking advantage of the "middle school moment." >> any school can use this system to keep kids on track. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. major funding for this program is provided by the bill and melinda gates foundation. and by the corporation for public broadcasting and its american graduate initiative for "middle school moment." >> be good. >> i won't. >> yeah, i know. >> my ninth grade year was probably the worst because i was constantly being beaten up and, you know, jumped and everything. i was pretty much an outcast. constantly in the office,
. >> ...and the increased risk of serious injury. >> when he arrived to us, he was comatose and on the ventilator, and he went into renal failure. >> there have always been injuries in high school football, but they're on the rise. >> they teach us to play hard even when you're hurt. it's instilled in us since we were in junior high school. >> but what are the costs for the boys who play the game? >> you're only 17 once. i have the rest of my whole life to worry about pain. >> tonight, "football high." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan. committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation. dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. supporting investigative rep
affected. >> to us, it's just how we live. you don't get to make choices in how you live. >> one in 13 americans is now unemployed, and many children are growing up with little hope for their future. >> i'm surprised by how things can change so fast. you can go from doing okay to going hungry and on the verge of being homeless again. >> and we're going to start with numbers one through 20. >> food banks struggle to keep up with demand, and homeless shelters have long waiting lists, as even middle-income families sometimes lose their homes with just a few days' notice. >> if the tv can fit in your school bag, you can take it. if it didn't fit, you couldn't take it. >> we asked these children wht a life being poor in america really looks like, through their eyes. >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis ovidedy thjohn. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available a
to that time and use our best efforts to understand that story... of a man born in obscurity in whose name a faith was made. >> narrator: we know so little about him-- that he was born more than 2,000 years ago, and that he lived in palestine. we know he was baptized and became a preacher. and we know that he was publicly executed. >> ( dramatized ): what manner of man is this that even the winds and the seas obey him? >> narrator: with so little evidence to go by, archaeologists must sift the clues, and scholars decode the stories told by the first followers of jesus. >> the problem for any historian in trying to reconstruct the life of jesus is simply that we don't have sources that come from the actual time of jesus himself. >> the historian's task in understanding jesus and the jesus movement and early christianity is a lot like the archaeologist's task in excavating a tell. you peel back layer after layer after layer of interpretation, and what you always find is a plurality of jesuses. >> history isn't made to record the deeds of a person like jesus. jesus is very much like most peop
authority?" "what does god want us to do?" >> this era was an age of definition, not just for christianity, but also for judaism. it marks the emergence, for the first time, into the light of history of a new group and a new culture, and a new literature and a new way of thinking and writing. >> narrator: without the temple, the priesthood that had presided over its rituals lost its power. there emerged new leaders, the pharisees, rabbis who would lead the jewish people in a new direction. >> and the rabbis represent for us a new age of definition. it is the rabbis who now emerge as a new kind of judaism, and it is this judaism which will endure from the second century of our era down to our own age. ( music playing ) >> narrator: the failure of the first revolt also created a crisis for early christians who were still a part of judaism. the kingdom had not come; the messiah had not arrived. the followers of jesus coped by telling stories about the man they had expected would deliver the new kingdom on earth. >> we have to remember that jesus died around 30. for 40 years there's no written
the average for construction workers. >> jay guilford, actually, this is what he was using... >> smith: to find out why, reporters at frontline and propublica investigated the 50 cell related deaths. but did they address the question of responsibility for... after pouring over thousands of documents, we discovered a complex web of subcontracting that has allowed the major carriers to avoid scrutiny when accidents happen. >> any of your cell phone carriers, as far as their concern, safety is our issue, not theirs. >> smith: ray hull is a tower climbing veteran. before cell phones, he worked mostly on tv and radio towers. >> any major tower company knew who i was, knew who my dad was, my granddad. i'm third generation in that line of work. >> smith: but with the boom in cell phones, the industry suddenly changed. >> there was a big push for these cell companies to start expanding out and covering the dead areas, everybody trying to outdo everybody. >> 15, 20 years ago, a good tower company might... might build four towers a year. now timelines are radically different. so instead of contr
, there may be a vaccine. >> thanks for visiting with us. hey, kids, how about saying goodbye, huh? >> say goodbye. >> come on, say bye-bye. >> when i was a child and the big scare was polio, where you would see your friends playing ball outside with you-- baseball and basketball-- and all of a sudden get sick and be in bed, be in an iron lung, and then come out with a deformity, a serious limp or a serious physical disability. that is absolutely frozen in your mind as a very scary scenario. >> i think we're compelled by our own fears. and certainly for my parents, who grew up in the... in the 1920s and '30s and '40s, saw these infections. they saw what they could do. for them, vaccines was an easy sell. >> narrator: paul offit is a pediatrician and co-inventor of a vaccine against rotavirus, a pathogen that causes serious fever, vomiting and diarrhea. >> i grew up in the 1950s and '60s. i saw measles. i had measles. i had mumps. i had german measles. i mean, i knew what those diseases could do. i watched my friends also be sickened by those diseases. and so, for me, vaccines was an easy s
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)